Difference between revisions of "V"

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The '''Tektronix Type V''' is a video plug-in for [[500-series scopes]].
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{{Plugin Sidebar
It never went into full production.
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|manufacturer=Tektronix
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|series=500-series scopes
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|type=Type V
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|summary=Video plug-in
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|image=Tek v.jpg
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|caption=Tek Type V
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|designers=Larry Biggs;Ron Olson;Phil Crosby
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|introduced=(never)
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|discontinued=(never)
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|manuals=
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n/a
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}}
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The '''Tektronix Type V''' is a video plug-in for [[500-series scopes]]. It never went into full production.
  
[[Larry Biggs]] was the project leader.
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[[Larry Biggs]] was the project leader. [[Ron Olson]] did the dual-trace vertical. [[Phil Crosby]] did the sync, D.C. restorer, and line selector.
[[Ron Olson]] did the dual-trace vertical.
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The design was started in late 1959. The plan was to have a plug-in that could functionally replace the [[524]].
[[Phil Crosby]] did the sync, D.C. restorer, and line selector.
 
The design was started in late 1959.
 
The plan was to have a plug-in that could functionally replace the [[524]].
 
  
 
See https://vintagetek.org/television-products/ about a third of the way down is a blurb about the V unit.
 
See https://vintagetek.org/television-products/ about a third of the way down is a blurb about the V unit.

Revision as of 10:01, 15 August 2021

Tektronix Type V
Video plug-in
Tek Type V

Compatible with 500-series scopes

Produced from (never) to (never)

Manuals

n/a


Manuals – Specifications – Links – Pictures

The Tektronix Type V is a video plug-in for 500-series scopes. It never went into full production.

Larry Biggs was the project leader. Ron Olson did the dual-trace vertical. Phil Crosby did the sync, D.C. restorer, and line selector. The design was started in late 1959. The plan was to have a plug-in that could functionally replace the 524.

See https://vintagetek.org/television-products/ about a third of the way down is a blurb about the V unit.

Although the V unit never made it to market, Ron Olsen ended up using much of the dual-trace vertical design in the 1A1.